FAQ

Q. How much is shipping?

Click here for Shipping Fees
A. Shipping is $3.95. The one flat rate of $3.95 is for all retail customers in the United States with orders below $100.00. When orders total more than $100.00, the weight increases and the fee for shipping will be $5.95. We ship to Canada for $6.95.

Q. Are your seeds untreated?

A. All the seeds we sell are untreated. There is no chemical dressing applied like a fungicide, an antimicrobial or an insecticide.

Q: Can I find your seeds in stores? 
Yes! Our seeds are featured in stores and garden nurseries around the country!  If you can't find our seeds in your area, ask your local nursery to get them. We sell Wholesale Chile Seeds to stores across the globe.

Here's a list of the stores that carry our seeds in New Mexico »  

 

Q. Do you offer discounts or coupons?
A. YES! We offer coupons and discounts exclusive to our social and newsletter followers. Like us on Facebook or Instagram and sign up for our Newsletter to receive periodical coupons that you can apply to your order. 

Q. Why are your New Mexico seeds shipped from Phoenix now?

A. Our business has grown over the past 10 years, and we now have business locations in Albuquerque, NM, Phoenix, AZ and Riverside, CA. Now, all 100 different seed varieties are being shipped out of Phoenix. The New Mexico seeds are directly from the New Mexican farmers that we have worked with since day one. I personally visit every location during the growing season to ensure top quality seed production. At the end of the season, I pick up the seeds and drive them to Phoenix. Locations include Hatch, Mesilla Valley, Socorro, Chimayo and a few more. I believe this is why we are so successful, because we have direct connections to the New Mexico farms.

Q. Which pepper is the hottest in the world?

A. Click Hottest Peppers Chart for a list of all our peppers in order of mildest to the world's hottest! Hint: The Trinidad Moruga Scorpion are the hottest pepper seeds!

Q. I want to grow green chiles that are medium hot, which one is that?
A. Here is a list of all the green chile seeds we offer in mild to hot order.
Mildest: Paprika, Poblano, Anaheim
Mild: Pasilla, Heritage 6-4, Big Jim Legacy.
Medium: Big Jim Heritage, Joe E. Parker, Hatch Green Chile, Guajillo, Chimayo, Espanola Improved, Fresno, Santa Fe Grande.
Hot: Hatch Red, Sandia Hot, Barker's Hot, Lumbre.
Extra Hot: Early Jalapeno, Serrano.
We suggest trying a few different varieties to find your favorite!


Q. Do you have seed planting information?
A. Yes, there is an article on our Blog Page titled Seed Planting Information. Click here to view it.


Q. What is the Tombstone Ghost pepper?

A. The Tombstone Ghost pepper is a Red Bhut Jolokia strain. It has been grown in southern Arizona for over 5 years. It matures sooner, has a smoother taste, has the same or a little less heat, and more 'vapor heat' than our Bhut Jolokia red. Vapor heat means the Tombstone Ghost burns your nose and eyes faster when it is cut open. We named this one the Tombstone Ghost because the crop grows near Tombstone, and Tombstone, AZ is haunted with ghosts.


Q. What should I use to support my pepper plants, I heard metal burns the plant.

A. A pepper plant usually doesn't need additional support. They grow like a bush, and can even support a heavy crop of peppers. If I thought my plant needed support I would push a 3-4' wood stake into the ground when it is planted. (so you don't do it later and damage roots) Then 'when/if needed' I would floral tape the main stem to it. I think a tomato cage would work too. Raised rows are good, so that when peppers touch the ground (because they are long and grew on the lowest branches), they are on dry dirt, or pick them. I haven't heard about metal burning plants. Good luck with everything.


Q. Why can't I grow the seeds that come from the dried chiles at the grocery store?

A. Most dried chiles at the grocery store have been oven dried not sun-dried. The oven reaches a high temperature that kills the seeds. If you are buying the chiles to make red chile, reserve some seeds for a germination test. (Put seedling mix in a cut off styrofoam cup at about 2 inches high. Place 10 seeds all around the top about 1/4" deep. Keep moist and in bright light for at least 4 weeks. If they sprout transfer to containers.)
Additional Note: Most dried chile pod bags just say "Red Chile" and not the particular variety.


Q. I can't decide which variety to grow, I want the actual "New Mexico Green Chile" that I eat at restaurants when I am in New Mexico.
A. "New Mexico Green Chile" consists of several varieties. I suggest growing the Big Jim variety first. This is a nice medium hot chile with a good harvest. It is a really big chile and fun to share with fellow gardeners! This variety can be roasted and then made into traditional tasting New Mexico green chile sauce. They can be cooked fresh for chile rellenos and also freeze well after roasting. After your first chile growing season, you can choose chile varieties for pungency (hotter or milder than Big Jim) and for your growing conditions (long or short season). If you have the garden space, try at least three varieties the first time! I would grow Big Jim, Espanola Improved and New Mexico #6.


Q. Is your New Mexico #6 Green Chile variety the New Mexico #6-4 that I like?
A. Yes, it is. The New Mexico #6, New Mexico #6-4 and the College #6 are all the same chile variety. This particular variety has remained the most popular with New Mexican home gardeners over many decades. It is mild to medium and can be used in so many ways for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
2009 Update: The New Mexico #6 has recently been developed into another variety with all its best attributes. It is called NuMex Heritage 6-4.


Q. This is not a question, I just wanted to comment that I am so happy that you are selling green chile seeds in packet size quantities. I love green chile, and as a gardener, I want to try a bunch of them. You have given me this opportunity for a small price.
A. Your very welcome. It is our pleasure to sell green chile seeds in packets. Please let us know what we can do to provide better service and products. Thanks again.

Q. I'm just wondering, are your seeds non-gmo?
A. All of our seeds are non-gmo. In fact, there are not any 'genetically modified organism' chile seeds developed yet. Many of our seeds are heirlooms and have been grown for generations. Heirloom seeds can be collected and grown again the following year. The NuMex varieties of green chile we offer have been hand selected at NMSU for desireable traits. This research takes several years and field grown trials to produce a chile plant with pods that have great taste, good yield, and other desirable characteristics. NuMex seeds can be collected and grown the following year. Hybrid seeds have two different parent plants that produce a seed with all the vigor and greatness from each parent. These cannot be collected and grown the next year to produce the same result.


Q. What does it mean to harden off seedlings before planting them in my garden?

A. This is an important step. Your plants have only known the indoor environment. Soon, they will be outside into full sun, cool nights, wind, and much more. Here is one way to do it.

First, place a gentle oscillating fan on your plants while they are still indoors. An hour or more on low is enough to strengthen their stems, or gently brush them with your hand everyday. Do this for at least a week if it hasn't been done since they emerged. Turn off the warm seedling mat. Unless your house gets below 60 degrees at night.

Second, place them outside in the shade during the day, and bring back in at night. They may need additional water so they don't dry out. This can be done for a few days.

Third, place them in partial sun during the day and back inside at night. Observe your plants to make sure they are still thriving, or back up one step. Gradually increase the amount of full sun they receive. For example 20 minutes, 45 minutes, 2 hours. The sun is very harsh here in Albuquerque, your time may lengthen faster. Above all make sure they have enough water. Finally, transplant into your garden on a warm mild day. You can temporarily shade transplants from the afternoon sun for one week.


Q. How far apart should I place the pepper plants?

A. Most pepper plants grow as wide as they are tall. So, if you are growing a 36” tall pepper like Trinidad Scorpion, each plant should be placed a minimum of 36” apart. That is 36” on center, from stem to stem. A zig-zag pattern will make the best use of your valuable garden soil.


Q. Can you plant seeds directly in the ground instead of germinating in pots?

A. Yes, the soil must be warm, and the seeds must be kept moist all the time. Germination will take longer because it won't be cozy like a seedling mat. Once the seedlings appear, they will catch up to the plants that were germinated indoors. *I would not try it with the super hots.

 

Q. Why is some of the information about growing peppers different on your webpage like the nighttime minimum for transplanting outside is 55'F in one place and 70'F in another?

A. Great question. There are different variations of the same growing procedures in the articles on our website. That's because every garden is different and we like to give an general overview that will help a majority of gardener's in their different climates, soils, weather and level of expertise. We know our advice is usually slightly modified to fit their particular garden. The 55'F would represent a micro-climate that has fast draining soil and is against a south facing wall, and the 70'F represents a garden with heavy wet soil. We hope all gardeners are able to use our advice as a guideline for their specific situations and be successful. 

 

 

 

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